The Property

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Key 

Au
Au 53.7 t/g
Au 18.2 t/g soils

2018 Exploration Highlights:

105.5 g/t Au rock assay
112 g/t Au rock assay
5g/t rock assay


Little Bear Lake:

The Little Bear property consists of 24 claim units and lies 4 km north of the town of Schreiber, and 15 kilometers southeast of the past producing Winston Lake Zinc Mine.

Access is via gravel road from the town of Schreiber which turns into a winter road (ATV trail) that goes to Big Duck Lake. An old road branches off the Big Duck Lake trail just north of Cook Lake and heads east to Big Bear Lake and the property.

Big Bear Lake:

The Big Bear property consists of 44 claim units and lies 5 km north-east of the town of Schreiber.

Access is via gravel road from the town of Schreiber which turns into a winter  road (ATV trail) that goes to Big Duck Lake. An old road branches off the Big Duck Lake trail just north of Cook Lake and heads east to Big Bear Lake and the property.

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Geology

The properties are located in the east-west trending Big Duck-Schreiber greenstone belt. In the Schreiber area the belt is composed of generally east-west trending, northfacing, mafic metavolcanics with minor metasediments and mafic intrusive rocks. The most important structural feature of the Big Duck-Schreiber Region is the east/west trending anticline which neatly divides the area between its north limb and its south limb. The core of the anticline is occupied by a large granitic body. The rock types in the southern portion of the Big Duck-Schreiber area show a lower greenschist facies metamorphic grade.

The property consists of basaltic flows that are separated by different types of sedimentary rock. These sediments take the form of the typical banded oxide iron formation common in the Schreiber area. The strike of the iron formations are northwest to southeast and consist of alternating 1-2 cm wide bands of magnetite and chert. The widths vary from one to four meters. These formations can be traced across the entire width of the property.

Big Bear Project Exploration in 2018

Work conducted during November 2018 included a orientation programme consisting data compilation and interpretation, soil geochemistry over five gridded areas, three within the Big Bear claim area, and one each within the Little Bear and Schreiber Pyramid claim areas, and rock chip sampling within the Little Bear and Schreiber Pyramid areas.

• The orientation programme was designed to plan follow up work and to verify results collected by previous claim holders and confirm historical gold occurrences. The orientation has successfully delineated a number of high priority targets for an inaugural Phase 1 Exploration Programme scheduled to commence as soon as the ground becomes clear of snow in early Q2 2019.

Highlights from 2018 Exploration at Big Bear

Veins grading up to:
112g/t Au with exceptionally high soil anomalies

Gold in soil anomalies outlined in four of the five areas tested with anomalies ranging up to 0.71g/t Au in soil. The maximum soil assay for  the previous 2011 Little Bear soil sampling programme was an exceptionally anomalous 18.2g/t Au in soil.

Encouraging Rock Assay Results

Gold bearing quartz veins were outlined within seven separate areas:
Two quartz samples collected:
105.5 g/t Au and 112 g/t
Four areas with quartz vein assays above:
5g/t Au
Two areas of rock and vein samples:
1g/t Au - 5g/t Au
Phase 1 Exploration Programme 2019

A Phase 1 Exploration Programme for the spring summer work season of 2019 is now being planned. Work is expected to include:

  • Infill soil sampling, ground magnetics, selective stripping and geological mapping across anomalies identified during the orientation and 2011 work programmes,especially the five areas with veins containing high grade gold.
  • Systematic soil sampling and ground geophysics on two high priority survey grids, ‘Schreiber Ridge’ and ‘Big Bear Ridge East’, which cover the up to 1.5km long strike extensions to gold anomalies outlined in the orientation programme and which coincide with perceived structural lineaments and regional scale geophysical anomalies outlined by government airborne magnetic and resistivity survey data.
  • Systematic soil sampling and ground geophysics conducted over two additional grid areas, ‘Big Bear Ridge West’ and ‘Big Bear Bottom’ which coincide with both perceived structural lineaments and airborne geophysics anomalies, but which remain largely untested by any previous work.